Cătălin Alin Costea
Cătălin Alin Costea
Sophomore in the Master of International Relations program of the Faculty of Political Science, University of Bucharest, specializing in security studies
The Russian Federation and the Implementation of the A2/AD System in the Black Sea: Risks and Threats to Romania

The Russian Federation and the Implementation of the A2/AD System in the Black Sea: Risks and Threats to Romania

The Crimean Peninsula was under Tatar control until the end of the eighteenth century when Catherine II announced the annexation of the region in 1783 to the Russian Empire. She established the main naval base of the Russian Empire on the Black Sea in the city of Sevastopol in 1785. It retained its importance until 1991 when the Soviet Union collapsed and the peninsula became part of independent Ukraine since it had been offered to the Ukrainian SSR as a gift in 1954 by Nikita Khrushchev, the leader of the Soviet Union at that time, celebrating 300 years of Russian-Ukrainian friendship. The breakup of the Soviet Union meant that its successor state, the Russian Federation, lost the strategic position and the freedom of maneuver which Crimea offered in the Black Sea region. However, Moscow would regain its position on May 28th 1997 when Russian President Boris Yeltsin and Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma signed the Treaty of Friendship Cooperation and Partnership in Kiev. Among other things, it created the division of the Soviet Black Sea Fleet in two parts and allowed the use by the Russian Federation of the Ukrainian port of Sevastopol and its territorial waters until 2017, for 98 million dollars per year.[5] More

No. 3, Jan.-Feb. 2017 2017


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The Romanian-American Foundation for the Promotion of Education and Culture (RAFPEC)
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Amfiteatru Economic

OEconomica No. 1, 2016