Long Live Europe!

Long Live Europe! But Whose Europe?

No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

European Union remains one profoundly unaccomplished political project for too many reasons. Despite a continuous external growth, since the inception, and internal maturation, it was not able to fill entirely the “real estate” of the cultural habitat which – by both stretches of the mind and grace of geography – was and is considered to represent the whole (and holy) Europe: the Norwegians and the Swiss were not seduced by the “tender offer” Brussels displayed towards them, though they are solid parts of the continent’s historical trunk either in its “heroic” (the Viking expeditions by sea) or in its “settled” (Europe’s inland highly celebrated democracy) epochs. Also, EU struggles to digest and metabolise some of the Central and Eastern European new-comers, while the Western Balkans, with the residual nation-states of the ex-Yugoslavian failed multinational union, seem, with the notable exception of Croatia, so “estranged” from Europe. More

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    Twelve Countries Cumulate 80% of the Pandemic Deaths

    Twelve Countries Cumulate 80% of the Pandemic Deaths

    No. 24, Jul.-Aug. 2020

    The “parallel world” of the pandemic has two main coordinates: contagion cases and deaths, accompanied by the very important indicator of fatality rate relative to contagion cases (Rc/d).In our previous interventions, we demonstrated that the... More



    The Absorption of Uncertainty and Exiting from the Pandemic

    The Absorption of Uncertainty and Exiting from the Pandemic

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The individuals (and, to some extent, the groups) make decisions based on their perception regarding the future, rather than on a rigorous calculus based on accurate models of rationality (such a conclusion has long been reached by the researchers... More



    A New Silk Road – Russia’s position

    A New Silk Road – Russia’s Position

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The first version of the Silk Road is placed by analysts at the beginning of the westward expansion of the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD). Chinese products (silk, porcelain, spices or other goods) that were highly prized began to be delivered to Europe... More



    NASA & SpaceX Launch – A New Milestone in Space Exploration

    NASA & SpaceX Launch – A New Milestone in Space Exploration

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Over the years, space has proven to be one of the few topics that captivated people from all around the world to follow the same TV programming or online event at the same time. Individuals with different backgrounds, ethnicities, races... More



    Reading Between the Lines

    Reading Between the Lines

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The macroeconomic situation of Romania is a subject of considerable debate inside the country. The important development of the country is, nevertheless, marred by imbalances and underwhelming reforms, constantly... More



    Conservatism and Spiritual and Social Recovery

    Conservatism and Spiritual and Social Recovery

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    As I read newspapers, popular magazines, listen to National Public Radio, watch cable television, attend Catholic Mass, and work with American academics at the deracinated institutions called colleges, I am conscious that American secular... More



    Revolt of the Disdained: Sovereignty or Submission

    Revolt of the Disdained: Sovereignty or Submission

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The 2016 presidential election hinged on the return of overlooked or marginalized middle-class and working-class Democrats and independents – many of whom had earlier supported Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan – to reinvigorate traditional... More



    Some Thoughts on COVID-19 Pandemic Shock

    Some Thoughts on COVID-19 Pandemic ShockEconomy Near Us (XXIX)

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    On the nature of COVID-19 pandemic shockWe think the COVID-19 pandemic shock “verifies” the following features:the shock is atypical: it has the particularity that it bypasses the standard “path” – that is, it does not affect the nominal flows... More



    Coco & Chanel: Creating Herself and a Whole Universe, from Croquis to Couture

    Coco & Chanel: Creating Herself and a Whole Universe, from Croquis to CoutureMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XVI]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Imagine the epitome of an elegant, stylish woman of modern times. Is she sporting chic suit pants and a matching blazer, or maybe a timeless black dress? Is her jewellery exquisite without overbearing opulence, perfectly assorted to her handbag... More



    Will We 3D-Print Medicine at Home?

    Will We 3D-Print Medicine at Home?MIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XV]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    It is around 7 AM, little Jim has just been woken up by his mom. He can distinguish clatter of softly gyrating gears from rain taping at his windowsill. There was no reason to focus more on those everyday sounds especially because he heard the same... More



    Three Paradoxes of the Territorial Distributions of Contaminations with COVID-19

    Three Paradoxes of the Territorial Distributions of Contaminations with COVID-19

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    A month ago, in the first episode regarding the pandemic, we identified the fact that the structural distribution of the spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus throughout the countries and autonomous territories of the world fulfils all the standards of the... More



    Power Through Play: Thinking Energy Outside the Box

    Power Through Play: Thinking Energy Outside the BoxMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XIV]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    According to the World Bank (2019), roughly 1 billion people have no access to electricity whatsoever, but a Nigerian-American entrepreneur thinks football might be the solution. How is it possible? The story begins with Harvard graduate Jessica... More



    The Million Dollar Pixels: How a Student’s Idea Changed the Internet for the Better

    The Million Dollar Pixels: How a Student’s Idea Changed the Internet for the BetterMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XIII]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The internet. A place where (almost) everybody can see (almost) everything (almost) for free. An incredible technological asset of humanity as a whole. But how can we find everything? Do we pay these people? How many people would agree to make the... More



    Bringing Lasting Positive Change for Women

    Bringing Lasting Positive Change for Women

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Any change brings both positive and negative consequences. Therefore, a development planner should respect various principles to promote change that minimizes negative effects. Also, certain priorities or values should be reflected. This... More



    Making History While Snacking: Microwave Meets Marketplace

    Making History While Snacking: Microwave Meets MarketplaceMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XII]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    World War II, going on between 1939 and 1945, was one of the bloodiest confrontations in the world. It cannot be overstated how much this conflict changed the course of history, for better (if anything good can be related to wars) or worse. For... More



    Think Fast: Interactive Filmmaking Puts Consumers in the Spotlight (Or Is It Just an Illusion?)

    Think Fast: Interactive Filmmaking Puts Consumers in the Spotlight (Or Is It Just an Illusion?)MIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [XI]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    In 1967, the cinephiles attending that year’s edition of Expo Montreal were left with the experience of a lifetime, having been submerged into a new dimension of film-making. Radúz Činčera’s vision brought the audiences a new perspective, as his... More



    The Risk of Poverty by Age-Groups in Romania

    The Risk of Poverty by Age-Groups in RomaniaHistory, on the verge of repeating itself after ten years

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The risk of poverty recorded in Romania for the entire population was higher in 2019 than in 2008, according to data published by Eurostat. Almost one in four Romanians (23.8%) had an equivalent level of disposable income less than 60%... More



    Centuries of “Concrete”-Solid Discoveries of the Humankind: From Building the Roman Empire Towards Contemporary Buildings

    Centuries of “Concrete”-Solid Discoveries of the Humankind: From Building the Roman Empire Towards Contemporary BuildingsMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [X]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Have you ever questioned what lies at the basis of the so-called highly-developed cities, at the foundation of the tallest buildings worldwide or how the infrastructure came to life? The answer is directed towards… concrete. It built the modern world... More



    WaitSafe in the Pandemic: How to Fluently Reconcile Social Distancing with Personal Mobility

    WaitSafe in the Pandemic: How to Fluently Reconcile Social Distancing with Personal MobilityMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [IX]

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The easing of the lockdown ignited with the advent of COVID-19 pandemic is still subject to strict conditions, as communities need to accommodate sanitary safety concerns with solutions for the freedom of movement for individuals, as the latter is a... More



    The Press – Social “Mediator” or “Instigator”?

    The Press – Social “Mediator” or “Instigator”?

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    On the 3rd of May we celebrate World Press Freedom Day. The power of the Press (hereinafter deliberately written with capital P, in speaking precisely of its societal vocation) and its impact on the average citizen and on the wider masses of the people is... More



    More than a Fifth of Romanians Are Employed by Multinationals

    More than a Fifth of Romanians Are Employed by MultinationalsFrance Took over from Germany

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Germany (16.6%), France (12.4%) and Italy (9.2%) are the countries that hold the largest share in the Romanian economy by the number of employees operating in 80,591 groups of enterprises, according to the data processed and... More



    COVID-19’s Distributions and Balances of Power

    COVID-19’s Distributions and Balances of PowerProfessor CEZAR MEREUȚĂ: “Understanding this is the new challenge the most powerful leaders in the world have to face”

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Who would have thought that precisely the most powerful countries on the planet, which invested the most in their health systems, registered the most cases of contamination with the new coronavirus? Well, an analysis by Professor Cezar... More



    The Romanian Government’s Underwhelming Response to the COVID-19 Crisis

    The Romanian Government’s Underwhelming Response to the COVID-19 Crisis

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The Romanian Government’s response to the COVID-19 crisis has nothing exceptional, no original idea, no single individualized policy, no special or particular focus. If Sweden, no matter how controversial, dared to pursue an individualized strategy... More



    European (Dis)Integration During Pandemics

    European (Dis)Integration During PandemicsLessons for EU members about the convergence of interests

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    The big aspirations of “Unity in diversity” within European speeches seem to fade, as the supranational gathering around connection and cooperation is now, in the context of the pandemic, an ideal with less commitment than before... More



    Romania – the Fourth EU Economy in the Share of Foreign Capital Enterprises

    Romania – the Fourth EU Economy in the Share of Foreign Capital EnterprisesAnd an Interesting Paradox

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Romania ranks fourth among EU Member States in terms of the share in gross value added (GVA) of enterprises with foreign capital (controlled from abroad) – FCE –, according to a study published by Eurostat, based on data from 2017... More



    Pandemic: How to Avoid What Is Worse

    Pandemic: How to Avoid What Is Worse

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    In addition to major health issues, COVID-19 creates major economic problems. The risk of a deep global recession is very high. It is a shock that reduces supply, especially through the shock on the labour force, through illness or social... More



    A Primer on Political Economy

    A Primer on Political Economy

    No. 23, May.-Jun. 2020

    Economist Walter E. Williams learned a principle of success by missing lunch. “At 13, I was a typical barbarian growing up in the slums of Philadelphia”, he recalls. “My mother supported us by working as a maid. Frivolous consumption often meant... More



    Exploring the Transformation of Human Work in Relation to the Shock of the Novel Coronavirus Pandemic

    Exploring the Transformation of Human Work in Relation to the Shock of the Novel Coronavirus PandemicEconomy Near Us (XXVIII)

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    Work is one of the concerns of our daily lives. Permanent, but often on very short-term, concerns about work issues are at the forefront of public debates specific to the economic or other fields of social sciences. Countless scientific studies and... More



    No Way In, No Way Out

    No Way In, No Way Out

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    Scratching beneath the surface of socio-political matters results in a multitude of findings and novelties. It is time that enough answers were given to the everlasting questions which naturally follow the inquiry into the reasonableness of dominating... More



    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part III): Diagnosing the Geopolitical and Geoeconomic Risks of the Coronavirus Outbreak

    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part III): Diagnosing the Geopolitical and Geoeconomic Risks of the Coronavirus Outbreak

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    In the previous parts, we argued why behavioural economics does a better job of explaining consumer and supplier behaviour in the time of the coronavirus outbreak than the neoclassical paradigm. Both approaches were discussed at a... More



    Coronavirus: Commission Hosts a European Hackathon to Develop Innovative Solutions to Fight the Outbreak

    Coronavirus: Commission Hosts a European Hackathon to Develop Innovative Solutions to Fight the Outbreak

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    As of 24 April and throughout the weekend, the Commission will host the pan-European #EUvsVirus Hackathon, under the patronage of Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth. The hackathon... More



    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part II): Zooming in on Economic Decision-Making in the Time of the Coronavirus

    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part II): Zooming in on Economic Decision-Making in the Time of the Coronavirus

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    As we have reemphasized, neoclassical economics, with all its shortcomings, is still considered to be the mainstream wisdom and the reconciliating synthesis of ages-old advances in economic science. Behavioural economics, for its part, is a rather... More



    The COVID Crisis and the 2nd Pillar of the Romanian Pension System

    The COVID Crisis and the 2nd Pillar of the Romanian Pension System

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    Far from the public attention, the value of the assets held in the seven private funds that manage the pension money in Pillar II for seven and a half million future pensioners decreased dramatically in the second part of February and continued to decline... More



    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part I): An Overview of the Coronavirus Outbreak and Its Insights for Economic Theory

    Mutating Mindsets and Contagious Behaviours (Part I): An Overview of the Coronavirus Outbreak and Its Insights for Economic Theory

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    It is no longer a secret that the new coronavirus outbreak is the most significant issue troubling mankind at the moment, generating a level of panic and uncertainty with powerful effects on all level of society, politics and the economy. What... More



    Was the Islamic State a Real State?

    Was the Islamic State a Real State?

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The self-proclaimed Islamic State, known to the international press under the ISIS moniker, became a true center of power in the Middle East in the period 2014-2017. Its success came with a background of instability generated by the Arab Spring... More



    The CORONAtion of Equality, the Abdication of Inequality

    The CORONAtion of Equality, the Abdication of InequalityOr viceversa?

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    We all are equal in front of death, but we are living lives in unequal ways, because of our deeply uneven endowments and unsimilar chances that Gods or odds reserve for us. We are (supposedly) alike in front of laws, while some... More



    Communicative Action, Subjective Perception and the Hermeneutics of Capital Structure

    Communicative Action, Subjective Perception and the Hermeneutics of Capital Structure

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    This article highlights the implications of the subjective communication and interaction between economic agents in the process of expanding individual and implicitly social knowledge. Each economic actor goes through a set of unique... More



    Free vs. Fair Trade – Pandemic Edition

    Free vs. Fair Trade – Pandemic Edition

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    At the beginning of studying economics, the two basic ideas every undergrad learns about are the theories of absolute and of comparative advantage, respectively. Ricardo, one of the most influential classical economists, claims that countries... More



    A Treatise to Challenge the World of Tweets

    A Treatise to Challenge the World of Tweets“Information may be abundant, but knowledge remains scarce”. This is the message of a collective of scholars from the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, the Faculty of International Business and Economics

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    One may reasonably question any new… old-style opus, in times of “fast and furious” facts and figures, expressions of international economic relations (scientific literature markets here included): Isn’t it enough that we are now part of an... More



    Smith, Hayek and the Virus: Entrepreneurial Responses in Times of Crisis

    Smith, Hayek and the Virus: Entrepreneurial Responses in Times of Crisis

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The world is struggling with despair in the face of an uncaring threat at the moment of writing these ideas: that word is not even worth mentioning any longer, since it is probably on the lips (and in the ears) of the majority of people worldwide.... More



    Taxation of Wage Earnings for Pension Purposes in Romania, since 1950

    Taxation of Wage Earnings for Pension Purposes in Romania, since 1950Some implications at present

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The income tax has increased about four times in Romania since 1950, according to data published by the National Institute of Statistics (INS). The evolution of gross and net earnings shows that we have reached a doubling compared to the period.... More



    Pandemic: Of Words, Beasts, and the Gates of Peace

    Pandemic: Of Words, Beasts, and the Gates of Peace

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The world is facing a pandemic. People are looking for ways in which to minimize its effects and defeat the virus. Some are taking all the necessary precautions. Some are treating the situation lightly. Some are panicking. And some… are.... More



    On the Self-Testability of the Minimum Wage

    On the Self-Testability of the Minimum WageEconomy Near Us (XXVII)

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    As I have shown, in a previous intervention, in which I explained the conceptual difference between the minimum salary (the actual minimum wage, with the particularity that is generated by the market, rigorously called “minimum nominal salary”).... More



    Corona-Economy: From Crisis to Rebuilding Trust

    Corona-Economy: From Crisis to Rebuilding Trust

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The Corona-Economy is already the grand economic challenge of the year 2020, but also of the political establishment. The latest developments are very serious, quite worrying for many sectors, which demand a coordinated response in terms of.... More



    The Race to The Bottom in Oil

    The Race to the Bottom in Oil

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    With the developed world in transition towards a short and medium-term economic self-flagellation as a means of reducing the impact of the SARS-COV-2 virus spread, there is little room for economic news that is not related to markets tumbling.... More



    Will the Coronavirus Amplify the Role of the Government in the Economy?

    Will the Coronavirus Amplify the Role of the Government in the Economy?

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    A defining phenomenon for virtually the last hundred years is the expansion of state influence in all areas. The extreme was reached in the communist and fascist countries, where, under dictatorship, all freedoms were altered. In Western.... More



    Brâncuși’s Endlessness and the Scarcity of Some Means

    Brâncuși’s Endlessness and the Scarcity of Some MeansTo whom does his work belong?

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The public subscription for Brâncuși’s “The Wisdom of the Earth”, to get it from private hands “back” to the Romanian state, failed not so long ago. In markets, big money is paid for his works, more than “all” Romanians managed to gather. The moral? Art.... More



    COVID-19: Counting the Cost

    COVID-19: Counting the Cost

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    Fighting epidemics, or stopping them from spreading, has a cost. The direct costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are, of course, deaths and the sickness that prevents people from working. However, the indirect effect or Economic Cost include the labor.... More



    How the Evolution of ITC Shaped the Field of Diplomacy

    How the Evolution of ITC Shaped the Field of Diplomacy

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    When looking at the historical evolution of diplomacy and foreign policy, for centuries they have ended up relying on the traditional establishment of delegations or ambassadors, formalizing bilateral and multilateral agreements regarding various.... More



    The CoVID-19 Pandemic – Changing the Paradigm

    The COVID-19 Pandemic – Changing the ParadigmSir William Osler: “Medicine is a science of uncertainty and the art of probability”

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    For almost three months now the entire world is in the midst of a very aggressive and rapidly evolving outbreak with new Coronavirus, that today is known as COVID-19. The origin of the outbreak is in China, the province of Hubei (Wuhan) and.... More



    A Strategy of Subversion

    A Strategy of Subversion

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    Half a century ago the German sociologist Helmut Schelsky succinctly dissected the political strategy of left-wing radicals in West Germany and the West generally. His essay, “The New Strategy of Revolution,” remains one of the best.... More



    (Corpo)Rational Person(ality)

    (Corpo)Rational Person(ality)

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    It is perhaps characteristic of modern times to gather large groups of people who share the same perpetual quest for what is called freedom of expression and action within a free world, to make use of it with every single opportunity they might.... More



    Interstellar Rights

    Interstellar RightsProviding more legal support to companies to explore outer space brings benefits to all mankind

    No. 22, Mar.-Apr. 2020

    The exploration of space is now shifting the paradigm as recent innovations put in light incredible discoveries. The space economy is undoubtedly the most captivating industry of the future. As it develops, dependence on satellite-based.... More



    From Energetics to Economics

    From Energetics to EconomicsStarting from the nodal analysis concept, engineer Cezar Mereuță opens up a new domain of inter-disciplinary research for economists

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The fine connoisseurs say that statistics are perfectly comparable with the beach attire of an attractive young woman: reveals what everyone is allowed to see, but hides from the public eye the most appealing details. Because statistics is a science.... More



    The Efficient Wage and Its Challenges

    The Efficient Wage and Its ChallengesEconomy Near Us (XXVI)

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The standard Economics states that the gross nominal wage which is consistent (that is, non-contradictory) with the criterion of economic behaviour of the employer – the gross profit maximization – must be at most at the level of monetary.... More



    Technology and Ethics: Of Man and Wisdom

    Technology and Ethics: Of Man and Wisdom

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    In Isaac Asimov’s Bicentennial Man, the fictional robot character of Andrew Martin spends centuries suffering many modifications in order to be accepted by humanity as one of their own.The story shows Andrew, whose name comes from the Greek.... More



    Romania: A New Energy Power

    Romania: A New Energy PowerAfter a slowly diminishing status, brighter days to come?

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    While contemporary interest in energy questions focus on the Middle East, Romania has an impressive record in petroleum production which can be traced to 1517. Romania has a history of more than 150 years in oil extraction and in 1838 became.... More



    A Leaflet for Economics?

    A Leaflet for Economics?

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    It may be rightfully supposed that the first few months of higher education represent a turning point for most people. It is undoubtedly of a great importance that people take the decision of wholeheartedly stepping into a new environment and.... More



    Europe after Brexit: Isolating the Continent

    Europe after Brexit: Isolating the Continent

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The exit of the United Kingdom from the European Union remains undoubtedly the event of the year 2020. From a technical, procedural and institutional point of view, it was an impeccable, flawless process, according to the provisions... More



    With Regards to Government Charity for the Private Sector

    With Regards to Government Charity for the Private SectorEconomy Near Us (XXV)

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    In a market economy, which is also presumed to function within a free society, generally, the goods and services needed for individuals are acquired through economic transactions (regularly through work and the processes around it – saving... More



    Relations with East Asia – A View from Romania

    Relations with East Asia – A View from Romania

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The situation of the world today makes it difficult to even agree on whether we, as humanity, are going towards the right or the wrong direction. This is indeed a time of increasing fluidity, fake news, rapidly rising populism, which all makes vision and... More



    The Future of Cars: Reinventing Transportation

    The Future of Cars: Reinventing Transportation

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The automobile industry’s cycle-race to embrace electric and autonomous vehicles did not include all its factories and workers. Neither did softening global auto sales help the market situation. And a change in the downward slope of the number of... More



    On Brexit and Other Exits

    On Brexit and Other Exits(Praxeo)Logical insights regarding economic and political integration

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The United Kingdom has just spent its first days out of the European Union. The exit, completed by the Prime Minister Boris Johnson (the third British PM in a row, since Brexit began, four years ago) together with his political counterparts from... More



    A Perspective by and for the Youth

    A Perspective by and for the Youth

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    To most of us, it goes without saying that today’s youth will be tomorrow’s helmsmen amidst the tumultuous sea that life is. For “the little ones had become big, and the big ones had become almost men during the two years they were adrift in the... More



    My Mauser Is Bigger than Yours

    My Mauser Is Bigger than YoursThe arms race in the South Caucasus

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The arrival of four recently acquired Russian Su-30SM heavy multifunctional jet fighters in Armenia is far from being defined as ‘turning the chessboard on one’s opponent’, but it definitely triggers a new stage in the arms race between Armenia... More



    Political and Economic Fallacies: A Tribute to Sir Roger Scruton

    Political and Economic Fallacies: A Tribute to Sir Roger Scruton

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Adam Smith’s invisible hand, Frederic Bastiat’s essay “What Is Seen and What Is Unseen,” Michael Polanyi’s Tacit Dimension, Friedrich Hayek’s “spontaneous order,” and the Christian doctrines of subsidiarity and sphere sovereignty – these... More



    Leadership à la CEE: Values & Approaches

    Leadership à la CEE: Values & Approaches

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Another book review? Of yet another leadership book? There are and continue to appear so many books on leadership from so many angles, including innovation, creativity and artificial intelligence. And yet, what makes this particular book... More



    Russia’s Trump Card against China and Reshaping Power Dynamics

    Russia’s Trump Card Against China and Reshaping Power DynamicsWhat Russia stands to gain from the US - China rivalry

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    On 18 December 2019, Donald Trump, the current President of the United States of America, was impeached by the House Judiciary Committee following allegations of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, the third US President to be... More



    Russian Relations with North Korea

    Russian Relations with North Korea

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The changing relationship between Russia and North Korea has its beginnings when the Soviet Union and China became rivals for influence within the Communist world. In the contemporary context, there is a triangle of complicated relations... More



    The Market Liberalization of Space Odysseys

    The Market Liberalization of Space Odysseys

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Towards the end of 2019, a software issue during launch meant that Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft was unable to perform its first mission to supply the International Space Station as intended. It might by counted as merely one of the many problems... More



    The Anthropocene-Fallacy: Learning from Wrong Ideas

    The Anthropocene-Fallacy: Learning from Wrong Ideas

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The Anthropocene is a proposed geological epoch dating from the commencement of significant human impact on Earth’s geology and ecosystems, including, but not limited to, anthropogenic climate change. While it is not an... More



    The “Avenger” from SpaceX and Tesla

    The “Avenger” from SpaceX and TeslaMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [VIII]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    The main purpose of this essay is to highlight the life and the entrepreneurial journey of one the most influential people of the moment and how he permanently changed the world with his abilities and perception of things. Elon Reeve Musk... More



    BTS – The Freedom of Musical Expression Remains Unlimited

    BTS – The Freedom of Musical Expression Remains UnlimitedMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [VII]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    In the past, there was The Beatles. In the second half of the 20th century, The Beatles became the most popular band in the entire world. Time passed and the 21st century brought new legends to the music industry. Most likely the biggest boy band in... More



    Foundation: The Very Basis in Makeup

    Foundation: The Very Basis in MakeupMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [VI]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Perhaps everyone who uses makeup has wondered at least once about its origins? Every little thing has its own past but not a lot of people know the history of foundation. Surprisingly, its antecedents are not as pretty.Foundation traces its... More



    Mr. Sam’s Walmart Empire in Uncle Sam’s American Republic

    Mr. Sam’s Walmart Empire in Uncle Sam’s American RepublicMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [V]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Samuel Moore (or how people liked to call him later on, “Mr. Sam”) was born in 1918 in Kingfisher, Oklahoma, and lived there until 1923 with his parents, Thomas Gibson Walton and Nancy Lee Lawrence Walton. He had a brother, James... More



    Innovation in the Eye of the Beholder: Optical Breakthroughs

    Innovation in the Eye of the Beholder: Optical BreakthroughsMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [IV]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    he commonplace objects that we surround ourselves with are just as indispensable for our everyday businesses as they are, individually and collectively, piecemeal retellings of different parts of our civilization and the progressive attempts by... More



    ADI DASsler’s “Impossible is Nothing” and “The Miracle of Bern”

    ADI DASsler’s “Impossible is Nothing” and “The Miracle of Bern”MIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [III]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    “It’s over! Over! Over! Germany are the World Champions!”, Radio reporter Herbert Zimmermann’s jubilant words still resound in the hearts of many Germans, as a newly-created West Germany conquered the most coveted trophy in international... More



    Apple’s Handheld Evolution: From the Newton MessagePad to the iPhone

    Apple’s Handheld Evolution: From the Newton MessagePad to the iPhoneMIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [II]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Ever wonder how some things came to be? Just look at your phone. We cannot even imagine life without it anymore, but it is not always that we think of how much sweat and tears were put into achieving this particular invention. To be more... More



    Make Education Relevant Again!

    Make Education Relevant Again!MIND(s that filled) THE GAP(s) [I]

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    “The times they are a-changin’” and, along with them, the people’s needs and desires are changing as well. This is reflected in many ways throughout the economy, but perhaps the most interesting example we can ponder are the transformations that... More



    The Market for Ideas: Supplying and Demanding Thoughtfulness

    The Market for Ideas: Supplying and Demanding ThoughtfulnessRuminations that inspired the creation, three years ago, of a wilfully free-speech and free-access, hopefully critical and creative, magazine

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    It has been three years since our project – The Market for Ideas – took shape. We have tried to present our readers with interesting ideas from a wide variety of fields and penned by a wide variety of others. To the best of our abilities, we have tried not to... More



    Crossroad Years

    Crossroad YearsSensing 2019, with a tint of 1989 and a glow of 2020+

    No. 21, Jan.-Feb. 2020

    Human beings are obsessed with identifying trends and motifs in the passage of historical ages and to personalize, even deify, their geographical cradles. From the very sages of cultures and civilization(s) to the common folk, it seems that every turn... More



    MORE ARTICLES

    Man, Mansion, and Motion (I)

    Man, Mansion, and Motion (I) A Forward History of Homesteading and Horsepowering

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Known as one of the economic foundations, human action, as stated by Ludwig von Mises, refers to action as any process which is based on a certain purpose and conscious behaviour. In order for the action to be done, people employ particular means, mechanisms, tools or other helpful implements. However, those tools are not necessary for men to act. Action can be exercised with or without additional equipment. David Gordon further details the action axiom in An Introduction to Economic Reasoning and outlines that actions are not necessarily linked to physical movement. The process of acting can be done either with mobility and motility (a case in which examples are more than obvious) or with no physical movement on the part of the subject. An action can be performed without physical movement if it passes the self-consciousness filter and aims towards an increase in utility. For example, being in a waiting room, a seated man can stand up (which is an action realized through movement) or can stay down (which is also an action as staying is done deliberately and consciously in order to rest his feet). As long as voluntarily not moving involves further consequences, the action still takes place. More

    The Reconstruction of the National Defense Industry, a Historic Opportunity

    The Reconstruction of the National Defense Industry, a Historic Opportunity

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Prior to 1989, the defense industry in Romania was an important contributor to the state budget, bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars and providing extensive employment. At that time, Romania ranked ninth in the world in terms of export of armament. In the early 1980s, Romania exported arms worth $670 million. More than that, two thirds of the armament and ammunition required by the Romanian Armed Forces were covered by internal production, which is an important security factor in a country’s ability to sustain a prolonged conflict. More

    Telecommute and Video Games – On the Future of Work

    Telecommute and Video Games – On the Future of Work

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Today, many new paths are being created towards financial security and professional accomplishments. The market allows for numerous choices. And the effects are seen throughout society. Certain people love jobs which involve a lot of traveling. Some, on the contrary, prefer to be in an office environment. Others want or need to stay at home. Those in the latter category, however, sometimes dread losing their income or are worried that they will miss out on professional achievements. They may even be concerned that society will look down on them for not working, which happens, perhaps more often than previously thought.  More

    Womenomics – Is It Worth Talking About Gender?

    Womenomics – Is It Worth Talking About Gender?

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Women Prime Ministers and Presidents are no longer newsworthy. At least not everywhere. Company presidents are so many that, again, the gender of a company’s CEO is not at all a newsworthy issue. At least no one wonders that the Northern countries, Ireland and some of the others have no issues with women in business or politics and generally consider diversity in almost all areas of public life as a norm. More

    Water – the Ultimate Geostrategic Resource

    Water – the Ultimate Geostrategic Resource

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Water resources are a vital substrate and precondition of life and human development has increased this importance, by introducing considerations of agriculture, economics, industry (especially metallurgy) and energy extraction. Where there is a shortage of water, competition for limited supplies may cause nations to consider access to water as a matter of national security and act accordingly. History is abundant in examples of competitions and disputes over cross-border freshwater resources, which in John Waterbury's (1979) vision is called hydropolitics. More

    The Private Academy

    The Private Academy And the “lost tools of learning”

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The Private Academy (www.academiaprivata.ro) is a purely private educational project. Initiated in the fall of 2015, it was meant as an alternative set up to recover the spirit of authentic education, devoid of official accreditations and useless stencils, and at the same time not dependent on captive clienteles. The idea behind it was that maybe there are people who still believe that education is a good thing that must be acquired not for diplomas or formalities, but for its intrinsic value. Likewise, maybe there are people who think education is a good thing and who believe that they have something to offer in this respect. The only genuine reform of education is to bring those categories together. More

    The European Construction. Intellectual Project vs. Emergence

    The European Construction. Intellectual Project vs. Emergence

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Society is a component element of Popper’s third world, i.e., of the world formed by objectivizing the content of thoughts (ideas, theories, desirability, etc.), which is achieved mostly by social action. This means that the social “objects” (therefore the economic “objects” too) appear, become and disappear only by social action. One may say that the social ontology is, simply, the effect of the social praxeology, that society is a political product (supra-individual cause and effect). Therefore, the social construction is a teleological construction obtained by completing the universal causes (material, efficient, formal) with the final cause (purpose). Being a teleological construction, the social construction is an intellectual construction (intellectual project), therefore a normative process, not a natural process (as one of the parents of the European construction, Robert Schuman, believed). More

    Do Not Miss the EU’s Ringing Bell!

    Do Not Miss the EU’s Ringing Bell!

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Romania has to comply quite quickly with the documents produced and published by the European Commission with regard to the future of the European Union. As authors, we are advancing some proposals according to which Romanian policymakers should see the reformation of the EU as a good opportunity to match the country’s future with the EU’s destiny. We are advocating for immediate steps to be taken if Romania will effectively contribute to a more united Union with Romania in it. All European partners should consider seriously the principles of solidarity and cohesion and sharing responsibilities for a stronger Europe. The disrespect these stakeholders felt during the last crisis was echoing in the lack of political discipline in many economic and social engagements regarding the EU as a whole and every member state individually. Romania has to take the opportunity to be closer to the decision-making process within the EU, thinking seriously about becoming a member of the Eurozone by joining the Banking Union and adopting the euro.  More

    Euro Adoption: Chance and Challenge for Romania

    Euro Adoption: Chance and Challenge for Romania

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Like the other Central and Eastern European countries, Romania committed itself to adopting the euro as soon as it will meet the necessary conditions. The candidates have, however, a considerably large margin of manoeuvre in determining the moment when they will adopt the euro. Especially two accession criteria to the Monetary Union – harmonization of the legal framework with the Eurozone standards and the prior participation in the European Exchange Rate Mechanism II (ERM) – are entirely under the sovereign control of the states. On the other hand, the institutions of the Eurozone have an important role in the euro adoption process, notably when it comes to assessing the extent to which a certain country is ready to participate in the ERM II. More

    Horror Vacui: The Crisis of Meaning of the Globalized World, as Demonstrated by the EU. A Jungian Approach

    Horror Vacui: The Crisis of Meaning of the Globalized World, as Demonstrated by the EU. A Jungian Approach

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    What does globalization mean? But actually, is there any meaning to it? If not, could one be edified? By whom, on what grounds, how and, after all, why would it matter? I will partly explore all these questions, with special regard to the European Union and, maybe surprisingly, on the grounds of Jungian analytical psychology (with some tints of phenomenology and hermeneutics).  More

    Can Prosperity Be a Catalyst for Integration?

    Can Prosperity Be a Catalyst for Integration?

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    More and more, in every segment of society, it has become clearer that the dimensions of societal progress must be better understood. As growth and development proved to be less relevant to measure societal progress, experts and decision-makers consider that another concept could be more relevant, namely economic prosperity. In the equation of the new concept, in addition to the economic dimension of development, the social one becomes essential. Reducing discrepancies across member states has always been one of the objectives of integration, but the evolution of each economy made it more difficult for the European entity to reach this goal. Another assumption is that European citizens consider that the European project started to undergo certain changes, a “social deficit”, so it is imperative to define the elements of the new social dimension of the Economic and Monetary Union.  More

    Does the European Union Pursue a Neo-Protectionist Trade Policy?

    Does the European Union Pursue a Neo-Protectionist Trade Policy?

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    With the advancement of the multilateral negotiations, which resulted in a significant reduction in the level of customs duties and other measures implemented at the border, traditional means of protection have become less important in the public policy equation adopted and implemented by the economic powers. These paradigm shifts have created a favourable framework for the proliferation of non-tariff measures, which have gained a significant influence on trade flows. The main analytical objective of this article is to analyse the trade policy of the EU, bringing to the fore the trend of restricting trade flows with third countries. There is some evidence that, in the 21st century, the trade policy of the EU continues to have a flavour of neo-protectionism, with the trend of restricting trade flows gradually increasing, calling into question the achievement of the desideratum of multilateral trade liberalization.  More

    The Worrisome EU Defense Union

    The Worrisome EU Defense Union

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    In 2016, the EU put forward a new vision and a new plan for a “Defense Union”. The proposals are supported mainly by France and Germany – Europe’s most notable military powers. France and Germany are also the two major continental contributors to NATO’s defense system. Presently, both of these European states look for a more substantial “European defense” structure by and for Europeans, but certainly not excluding NATO. While the French loudly claim that the current EU proposal was initially a French one, the German side has more interest in its success. The team of France and Germany is mainly an alliance of common pragmatic interests rather than of a common political will. Germany’s defense industry is in a better situation, while the French one is hindered by the country’s stagnating economy (i.e., the French deficit issue due to EU’s macroeconomic governance requirements). More

    Fortress Europe under Siege: The Ongoing Refugee Crisis

    Fortress Europe under Siege: The Ongoing Refugee Crisis

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The term “Fortress Europe” was used during World War II to denote European territories occupied by Nazi forces, as well as military operations conducted by the British military against mainland targets in Germany. It was also used by Britain’s enemy, Nazi Germany, to refer to its goal of conquering the entirety of Europe so as to create an impenetrable powerbase. After the war ended, the term was used in the context of the European Union’s policies on immigration, border control and trade matters, with positive connotations for conservative factions opposing migration and negative for the more open factions.  More

    The European Union Is in a Limbo of Its Own Making

    The European Union Is in a Limbo of Its Own Making

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The current woes of the European Union are intentionally treated superficially or obtusely in public discourse, as it also emanates from the prestige media which generally co-opts European elites to its worldview, even when they nominally disagree with specific policy prescriptions. Beyond the crisis of the moment and the tendency to transform everything into a morality play involving good and noble Europeanists and regressive nationalists, there are specific factors of its own making which hinder the EU’s adaptive processes and make it increasingly likely that the project may founder. Whether it does so under the blows of an unknown or unremarked crisis or threat (as most empires do), or whether it will simply strain under the accumulated errors and stresses of a thousand bad policy compromises, one should dismiss the “illusion of inevitability” that accompanies public discourse on globalization in general and EU regionalism in particular.  More

    Three Unions in a (Life)Boat

    Three Unions in a (Life)Boat Lessons for the Europeans, from the Americans and the Soviets

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The unions of states, in their either federalist or inter-governmental setting, are portrayed in economics and political science literature, by certain scholars and pundits, as quasi-romantic stories and, by others, as purely-cynical undertakings: they are, for the first, expressions of common destinies, while for the second, mere cartels of political exploitation. Though, beyond charitable or circumspect translation of state gatherings, the undeniable facts are that the state, as an organization of humans, has a maximizing logic and that this logic is exercised as the monopoly of (legitimate?) violence with the privilege of (unconsented?) expropriation, by taxation, regulation and inflationary redistribution of purchasing power. The maximization logic of the state (apparatus) – rightly de-homogenized from the rest of society – leads to a triple choice: to increase domestic exploitation, to expand abroad, or both. More

    Banks as Money Labs

    Banks as Money Labs Mervyn King, The End of Alchemy

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    A year has passed since the publishing of Mervyn King’s book The End of Alchemy. Money, Banking and the Future of the Global Economy, by Little Brown, London. Why, then, review it today? As readers will see for themselves, the book is definitely topical, not only as money and banks and global economy are leading characters on the world stage, but also as it is written in such a manner as to allow the (un)initiated peruser to gain (further, deeper) insight into the intricacies of world economy and how it came to be what it is today. More

    Food Wars

    Food Wars

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    ‘May the force be with you’, and it’s not Anakin Skywalker who possesses it, but it looks like you’d rather find it in old grandma’s cooking book. Dishes seem to have historically had the power not only to feed hungry stomachs and greedy souls, but also to beget monstrous diplomatic disharmonies. Not that it necessarily came to weapon-like conflicts, but still enough on the plate to leaven in a sourdough of cultural schisms.  More

    The Youth Atlantic Treaty Association and Its Role in Promoting Euro-Atlantic Values

    The Youth Atlantic Treaty Association and Its Role in Promoting Euro-Atlantic Values

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The Youth Atlantic Treaty Association (YATA) is a network of young professionals and academics who are interested in international security policies. YATA consists of 36 member organizations or so-called National Chapters, all of which are the youth wings of established NGOs in their respective countries. These NGOs act as the national chapters of YATA’s parent organization, the Atlantic Treaty Association (ATA). YATA’s vision is to be the leading youth network to foster the values of democracy, rule of law, liberty, peace and security, and reinforce the transatlantic link. More

    Building Civil Society Resilience in the Baltics

    Building Civil Society Resilience in the Baltics

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The Estonian Atlantic Treaty Association (EATA) is part of the Atlantic Treaty Association family of organizations. Being established in 2001, the main purpose was to prepare Estonian society to join NATO by introducing NATO as an organization and its values to the people. After joining NATO in 2004, EATA’s activities have been very closely related to NATOs public diplomacy and promoting NATO among the Estonian people. More

    Challenges and Opportunities for the Future of Competitiveness

    Challenges and Opportunities for the Future of Competitiveness

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Discussing competitiveness is both a challenge and an act of courage. Nonetheless, approaching a new perspective in this matter literally means walking into the lion’s den.Tackling such a challenge was a consequence of the subtitle of the Sectorial Operational Programme “Increasing Economic Competitiveness”, namely “Investing in your future” (structural instruments 2007-2013). This was the main instrument to bring into being the second specific priority of the National Strategic Reference Framework (2007-2013) – long-term improvement of the economic competitiveness in Romania – an aspect, which is covered by the National Development Plan as well. More

    “America’s Subprime-acy” in Retrospect

    “America’s Subprime-acy” in Retrospect (A decade after the first signs of another wasted crisis)

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Almost ten years have passed since the first symptoms of America’s subprime crisis emerged, yet the lessons of the “age of turbulence” remained unabsorbed by the great public. People devoured semi-explanations imputing the crisis to epidemics of greed and/or stupidity, ignoring the white elephant in the room: the flawed design of the modern finance & banking system. More

    Understanding Sudanese and South Sudanese “National Dialogues”

    Understanding Sudanese and South Sudanese “National Dialogues”

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Assessing the conduct and results of the recent National Dialogue in Sudan, and its current variation in South Sudan, reveals a lot about the countries’ political culture(s). The division of the biggest African state into an Arab-dominated, Muslim-majority North and the African, Animist-and-Christian South, completed in 2011, did not stop the flow of models of political “ways of doing things”. In many aspects, borrowing the neighbour’s ideas remains a natural choice.  More

    Saudi Arabia and the New Middle East

    Saudi Arabia and the New Middle East

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The Arab Spring, also known as the Jasmine Revolution, represents a series of protests that embraced the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), since the end of 2010, resulting in the collapse of certain authoritarian regimes in the region. In practice, the Arab Spring was externally regarded by Riyadh as a threat to its strategic security, potentially undermining its regional influence, as well as the Saudi alliances More

    Rendez-vous in Paris: Trump vs. Macron, Round No. 4

    Rendez-vous in Paris: Trump vs. Macron, Round No. 4

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    Paris sera toujours Paris, as the title of a famous song rightfully acknowledges: traditionally a land of grace and sophistication that inspired poets and artists for centuries, and the shiniest jewel in Europe’s crown, which, through its charme et charactere, can impress everyone who happens to be its guest, including world famous political leaders. Recently, it hosted one of the most important events on the current international relations agenda, namely a high-level meeting between the newly elected chef d'État of the French Republic, the young Emmanuel Macron, and the President of the United States, an already controversial figure, although relatively new in his position as well, Donald J. Trump. After their first three meetings at the NATO and G7 summits in May, and at the G20 summit in early July, during which each of them has been trying to tilt the balance of power, Macron invited Trump over on Bastille Day to celebrate and extend France’s thanks on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the US entry in the First World War. The anniversary was an excellent pretext for the two to get together and talk real politics, settle disagreements and figure out common approaches to the most important international problems, such as terrorism and climate change. More

    North Korea: “Reading the Tea Leaves”

    North Korea: “Reading the Tea Leaves”

    No. 5-6, May.-Aug. 2017

    The “hermit kingdom” of North Korea is back in the news, at the center of a new round of exchanges of bellicose declarations, underpinned by failed tests for intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) that, nevertheless, show the impressive progress of the country’s indigenous program. The missile capabilities are meant to provide a delivery device for the country’s nuclear weapons, the other great program beset by a string of failures and shoestring successes. Western observers are now attempting to “read the tea leaves” in order to predict when the country will have achieved the ability to threaten the continental United States, while the threat to its immediate neighbors, South Korea and Japan, remains real but uncertain. The weapon systems involved are complex and, as has been suggested of the recent failed test, prone to cyber-attacks and sabotage through the component supply chain. Rather, the immediate threat to a country like South Korea is all of the conventional artillery pointed at its capital, which would make flattening Seoul in a matter of hours a foregone proposition. With Donald Trump at the helm of the US and sending carrier groups in the vicinity, a man given to grand gestures as negotiating bids, the latest tensions with North Korea seem momentous, as if some form of denouement to the regime in Pyongyang is looming. The form it would take is critical to its neighbors, who fear both the ways in which the country can lash out violently, as well as the consequences of a collapse of power, such as millions of refugees trying to cross land borders or internecine warfare.  More

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    Amfiteatru Economic

    OEconomica No. 1, 2016
    IN THE AGORA
    Agora
    “Pierre Werner Centenary” medal “Pierre Werner Centenary” medal

    The National Institute for Economic Research “Costin C. Kirițescu” of the Romanian Academy bestowed the “Pierre Werner Centenary” medal to the Rector of the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Professor Nicolae Istudor, Ph.D., in recognition of his contributions to higher education and academic research and of his sustained efforts to promote the national culture and its values in the Wernerian sense of harmony and compatibility with the wider European civilization and its aspirations.

    The ceremony was occasioned by the 4th edition of the International Conference ESPERA 2016 on “Economic Scientific Research – Theoretical, Empirical and Practical Approaches”, which took place in Bucharest on December 15-16, 2016. Professor Nicolae Istudor’s keynote speech may be viewed here.

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    Geopolitics and the New Silk Road Geopolitics and the New Silk Road

    Professor Silviu Neguț, Ph.D., delivered a speech on the geopolitics of the New Silk Road and its Eurasian philosophical backdrop during a conference organized by the Black Sea University Foundation on the subject of “Oil and the New Silk Road”. The event took place on December 13, 2016, and brought together a host of noted Romanian specialists from academia, government and private sector. Among them were Vasile Iuga, Senior advisor at PwC Romania, Radu Dudău, the Energy Policy Group, and Liviu Mureșan, the EURISC Foundation. The discussions were moderated by Professor Dan Dungaciu, Ph.D., President of the Black Sea University Foundation and head of the Institute for World Economy, the Romanian Academy (details here).

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    NATO foreign ministers’ meeting NATO foreign ministers’ meeting

    Alexandru Georgescu was a participant, alongside Răzvan Munteanu, Iulian Popescu and Andrei Vlăsceanu, on the ZIUA Z (D Day) TV Show hosted by Col. (ret.) dr. Ion Petrescu on the subject of the latest meeting of NATO Foreign Ministers. The TV Show aired live on December 8, 2016, on 6TV and can be viewed online here.

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    Romania’s EU Council Presidency Romania’s EU Council Presidency

    On November 28, 2016, dr. Octavian-Dragomir Jora declared for Agerpres: “Looking forward to Romania’s Presidency of the EU Council in the first semester of 2019, our country has to employ wisdom and intelligence in mating two essential strains of modern governance by utilizing an appropriate political decision-making structure and an open and competent popular consultation. The first is going to be the often invoked ‘country project’. It does not have to represent a simple piece of ‘literature’, filled with the intellectual infatuation of the contributors and the documents’ custodians, but a two-directional educational exercise (between the decision-making and reflecting elites, on the one hand, and the public, on the other hand) and a sincere discovery of ‘national interest’. In my opinion, this is the best known ‘unknown’ of the domestic public discourse. It is a fixture in the national psyche post-accession, while remaining tantalizingly out of reach of both the public and the authorities and their advisors. The second one is this administrative exercise, which demands institutional maturity: the Presidency of EU Council. Addressed responsibly and rigorously, the course of managing the EU agenda represents a unique moment of opportunity and challenge which can have the benefit of improving Romania’s image as an exotic and erratic presence in the European picture”. (www.agerpres.ro)

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    European challenges for Romania European challenges for Romania

    Europarliamentarian Laurențiu Rebega and the Foundation for the Europe of Nations and Freedom organized on the 26th of November, in Târgu Mureș, the Conference “The European Union and Economic Challenges for Romania”. The event took place in proximity to the impending anniversary of Romania’s accession to the EU, nearly ten years ago. The presentations discussed the pros and cons of accession and highlighted the risks, vulnerabilities and threats that our country will have to manage. Professor Dumitru Miron, Ph.D., and Associate Professor Octavian-Dragomir Jora, Ph.D., from the Faculty of International Business and Economics, the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Professor Nicolae Băciuț, writer and publicist, and Cora Maria Muntean, President of the National Association of Romanian Merchants (ANCR), were among the speakers (details here).

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    CEECs and the geopolitical winter CEECs and the geopolitical winter

    Alexandru Georgescu was a participant, alongside Răzvan Munteanu and Iulian Popescu, on the Valori Euroatlantice (Euroatlantic Values) TV Show hosted by Col. (ret.) dr. Ion Petrescu on the subject of the Geopolitical Winter in Eastern Europe. The TV Show aired on November 20, 2016, on 6TV and can be viewed online here. Key quotes and comments can be found here.

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    Science and the metrics of visibility Science and the metrics of visibility

    Octavian-Dragomir Jora delivered a speech at Târgul de Carte Gaudeamus (the Gaudeamus Book Fair), on November 16, 2016, during the launch of an important book, “A concepe, a redacta și a publica un articol științific. O abordare în contextul cercetării economice” (“Conceiving, Writing and Publishing a Scientific Article. An Approach in the Context of Economic Research”), written by Vasile Dinu, Gheorghe Săvoiu and Dan-Cristian Dabija. Octavian-Dragomir Jora argues that the neglect of scientific dissemination in national journals is a result of a structure of perverse incentives for researchers, for whom a series of “minimalistic” criteria have been set with an exclusively external orientation and without an attempt to establish a reasonable set of coefficients for truthful comparison between internal and external publications. This leads to distortions of the Romanian landscape for reviewing, validating and disseminating scientific ideas, hindering their gradual entry into the worldwide scientific marketplace and maintaining an unproductive separation between national and global spaces (details here).

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    Riga 2016, China-CEECs meetings Riga 2016, China-CEECs meetings

    As a member of the EURISC Foundation, Alexandru Georgescu was the only Romanian attending the International Think Tank Forum of China and Central and Eastern European Countries held in Riga, Latvia, on November 4, 2016, in parallel with a series of other events related to 16+1 cooperation, including the Summit of the Heads of Government of 16+1, the launch of the Logistics and Transport Center for 16+1 in Riga, a business forum and a conference of sinologists. A short article in Romanian describing the event can be accessed here. A publication titled “Afterthoughts of the Riga 2016 China and Central and Eastern European Countries Think Tank Forum” can be accessed here, featuring also a contribution from Alexandru Georgescu.

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    16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives

    As a member of the EURISC Foundation, Alexandru Georgescu accompanied EURISC Foundation President dr. Liviu Mureșan to the International Conference on Synergies between 16+1 and the Belt and Road Initiative, organized by the Shanghai Institutes for International Studies (SIIS) on September 25-26, 2016, in Shanghai. A short article in Romanian describing the event can be accessed here.

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    EU, liberal or illiberal momentum EU, liberal or illiberal momentum

    The Center for Institutional Analysis and Development – Eleutheria (CADI), The Friedrich Naumann Foundation (FN), The Institute for Economic Studies – Europe (IES – Europe) and The Society for Individual Freedom (SoLib) organized The September School of Economics, Politics and Philosophy, September 20-25, 2016, at the Hotel Apollo Hermannstadt in Sibiu, Romania. This year’s theme was “Europe at the Crossroads: Illiberal Challenges, Liberal Alternatives”. On this occasion, Octavian-Dragomir Jora delivered a speech entitled “Brave New Europe: Technology, Democracy, Technocracy, Demagoguery” (details here).

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