Mara-Andreea Tudor
Mara-Andreea Tudor
Student at the Bucharest University of Academic Studies, the Faculty of International Economic Relations; amateur chess player, passionate about finance and geopolitics
Loneliness as a Disease: A Bird in Its Cage and the Effects of Consumerism

Loneliness as a Disease: A Bird in Its Cage and the Effects of Consumerism

In the fast-paced society we live in, the divide between generations is more pressing than it has ever been. Parents and children have always clashed, but the general saying nowadays is that “things were better in my time”. Whether you translate this phrase in Romanian, put into Japanese hiragana or find its equivalent in Arabic, the general sentiment is the same: degradation is impending and people yearn for better times, as they were before.Where does this sentiment actually come from? Is it some sort of en-masse illusion? Maybe it’s just a stage that every person goes through once they hit their midlife crisis. Is there some sort of truth to it? As humans, we compare every experience we engage in with past situations, in order to find answers. We use these models due to the fact that they are all we know and we thrive on precedents. So, when people go metaphorically back in time, they actually romanticize the sense of comfort that their youth brought them. This is done on micro-levels too. A 70-year-old always remembers his 50s fondly. A 40-year-old yearns to be 25 again. Some would say it is just the nature of man, and I tend to agree.So, where does loneliness come into play? More


The African Union Opportunity Act (AGOA): A Review of Trade Controversies and Opportunities

The African Union Opportunity Act (AGOA): A Review of Trade Controversies and Opportunities

The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) is a unilateral agreement commissioned by the US, with the purpose of increasing the volume of trade between the United States and Sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of such an act is to encourage trade between the United States and qualifying Sub-Saharan economies by reducing tariffs and quotas for certain goods exported from Africa to the US. African countries, however, need to meet certain qualifications. The trade agreement enables the US President to designate countries as eligible based on the following criteria: “market-based economies; the rule of law and political pluralism; elimination of barriers to US trade and investment; protection of intellectual property; efforts to combat corruption; policies to reduce poverty, increasing availability of healthcare and educational opportunities; protection of human and worker rights; elimination of child labor practices” (U.S. Trade and Development Act, 2000). Since its adoption in 2000 under the Bush Administration, AGOA has been the centerpiece of U.S.-African trade relations (Paéz et al, 2010, p.1). Around the same time as the adoption of AGOA, the Chinese government inaugurated a “strategic partnership” with 44 African governments during the Forum on China-African Cooperation (FOCAC). According to the American Chamber of Foreign Affairs, the Chinese administration has promised to increase its imports to a total of $300 billion exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa by 2024. More


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